Friday, August 22, 2014

Joana Gama & Luis Fernandes: Quest

Joana Gama (piano)
Luis Fernandes (electronics)
Quest (Shhpuma/Clean Feed; 2014)

There's a passion and beautiful that emanates from this recording that made me feel like I was listening to a mixture of Mitsuko Uchida, Harold Budd and Christian Fennesz. Quest, the stunning debut from Joana Gama and Luis Fernandes is holds elements of experiementalism as well as classical introspection.

The duo present a series of quiet yet evocative soundscapes that are both a backdrop and a window into along a beautiful journey. "Dream" (written by John Cage) is errielly performed to perfection by Gama. The addition of Fernandes atmospherics heading into the middle passages gives the piece a more transcendent feel than even the original piece.

"Twisted Moments" and "Quest" give the listener a different perspective on the duo. Both provide haunting elements of electronics with subtle melodic tones from Gama. "Twisted Moments" with it's killer bee swarm of effects is dazzling and probably shouldn't be listened to outside if you are afraid of the little black and yellow flying creatures.

While "Quest" includes all sorts of found sounds and plucking inside the piano. A creative piece that undulates in various directions all the while keeping very focus on providing a linear emotional experience.

Quest is a solid debut from Gama and Fernandes. Both experimental and traditional with a real sense of adventure and solace that is more than just ambient sounds. I really hope they do another record together very soon. Highly Recommended.

Saturday, August 16, 2014

Tom Tallitsch: Ride

Tom Tallitsch (sax)
Ride (Posi-Tone; 2014)
Art Hirahara (piano)
Michael Dease (trombone)
Rudy Royston (drums)
Peter Brendler (bass)
(live photo: courtesy my iPhone)

I just recently saw Tom Tallitsch perform in New York and was completely blow away. In addition, I was kicking myself as to why I never saw him perform before, as I have been a big fan for the last couple of years. But no matter, his live performance was just as stellar as his studio work. And his newest release, Ride is solid and well composed second effort worth every note.

One of the great things I've always enjoyed about Tom Tallitsch is his versatility. He can shift gears from a bold Ben Webster, Gerry Mulligan style to softer more emotional Sonny Rollins with each piece. Ride features that diversity early on with the opener, "Ride" is hard hitting and ferocious number that showcases Tallitsch big approach with this composition.

While the very interesting cover of David Bowie's "Life On Mars" and "Rain" are a great examples of Tallitsch moving in a more reserved and mid-tempo territory. Dease, Royston and Tallitsch give the rock classic and definitive spiritual feeling that complements the Bowie masterpiece warmly. "Rain," meanwhile feels both gospel influenced yet encompassing a soulfulness that shines above as one of my favourite tracks on the album.

"Knuckle Dragger" is another beautiful moment which Tallitsch highlights both great songwriting and leadership. A funky number that allows Dease, Hirahara and Brendler to stretch and provide some muscular flavour to session. It's a nice extend number that blossoms towards the end of this session.

Tom Tallitsch is now a veteran of the New York scene that really deserves wider recognition. Ride is another bright and confident addition to his cannon and well worth any jazz fans attention. And if he's playing in your city, don't be arse like me and wait forever to see him.

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

1982: A/B

1982 (trio)
A/B (Hubro Music; 2014)
Nils Okland (violin, fiddle)
Sigbjorn Appland (harmonium, piano)
Oyvind Skarbo (drums)

Fredrik Ljungkvist (clarinet),
Erik Johannessen (trombone)
Sofya Dudaeva (flute)
Matthias Wallin (sax)
Hanne Liland Rekdal (bassoon)
Stian Omenas (conductor)

You know when you stumble into that artist or group that seems to do no wrong with each release? Well, 1982 are that group. A/B is another sold chamber masterpiece deserving every minute of your attention. With the addition of writing material for a much large ensemble 1982 have enlisted a strong cast to help re-develop and expand on their vision.

Track 1, "18.06" is a shimming work of cinematic orchestration which is both beautiful, and extremely engaging. Rich in bassoon tones and bombastic drum patterns provide an exciting new glimpse of 1982 that we have not heard to this point in their history.

Delving deeper and broader in scope with A/B, the trio have develop an atmospheric tone reminiscent of Michael Brook and Jon Hassell. The second half of the session features percussive elements wrapped in the soft coils of the wind ensemble that handles each of the remaining piece with delicacy.

A/B is melodic and emotionally effective. A solid re-imagination for 1982. And probably the best the record to date. Yes, at this point they seem be able to do whatever they want with their compositions and instrumentation. Highly Recommended.

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Rodrigo Amado: Wire Quartet

Rodrigo Amado
Wire Quartet (Clean Feed; 2014)
Rodrigo Amado (sax)
Gabriel Ferrandini (drums)
HernĂ¢ni Faustino (bass)
Manuel Mota (guitar)

A Rodrigo Amado release is always going to be filled with some excitement. And Wire Quartet is definitely exciting and does not disappoint. A wonderful line up that features members of Red Trio and the increasingly rewarding, Manuel Mota. 

Wire Quartet consist of three very extended pieces. "Abandon Yourself" opens the album with slow building introduction where each member moves gently with well place focused notes. The piece moves into its second structure when Amado and Mota both let loose and Faustino and Ferrandini follow making this section of the piece the most chaotic and beautiful. The tone settles in the latter stages as each musician has their own moment to rise above. Great compositional/leadership work here from Amado allowing the members the freedom to craft the passages within the outlying structure.

Blues-like yet still encompassing sense of moving far beyond, "Surrender" has lots of free movements with Mota's guitar screeching like Branca, Bailey or Thurston Moore rolled into one. Amado's rolling tones and the some atmospheric brush-work from Ferrandini add a nice shine to the track. While on the closing number, "To The Music," Amado really let's loose with some terrific tones and patterns that feel like Ayler or Braxton. Mota's guitars wails alongside Amado but never overpowers the piece.

Wire Quartet is a rock album with jazz undertones. It loud, fierce and abrasive like any other Amado record. Similar to Amado's work with Luis Lopes but here we get the added touches of a fantastic quartet that pours even more muscle to Rodrigo Amado's compositions. Which I didn't think was possible. And the results are excellent and frankly--bloody brilliant stuff!